Expert Music Career Advice For DIY Musicians
4 Times You Shouldn't Take the Gig
The Number One Mistake Bands Make Right After Booking a Gig
The Ultimate EQ Cheat Sheet for Every Common Instrument
15 Reality Checks Young Artists Need to Hear

7 Ways to Judge a Music Blog Other Than Traffic

Image via Shutterstock

There are thousands of music blogs out there, and while you may want to send your latest album or single to every one of them, that would be a tremendously poor use of your time. Instead, target the right music blogs for your band.

Some people think bigger is better and will always look to a website’s hits and users to determine its value. While those metrics are useful if you’re an advertiser, as a musician you need to be savvy enough to know that a million hits doesn’t equate to a million people listening to your music.

When looking at music blogs, most metrics can be, if not totally thrown out the window, at least put to the side. In their place, find the answers to the following seven important questions.

Performing, Honing Your Craft

Mar 14, 2016 07:00 AM

Adam Bernard

Low Turnout at Your Show? Here Are 10 Secrets for Making the Night a Success Anyway

Adam Cruz of Xombie has seen staying late after shows pay big dividends with small crowds. (Photo by Adam Bernard)

Although it may be a bit depressing to step out onstage and see only a handful of people in the crowd, when it comes to putting on a great show, audience size doesn’t matter nearly as much as you think it does. According to indie pop rock artist Logan Lynn, "Some of the best shows I’ve been to with some of my favorite bands have been poorly attended, and some of the worst live garbage I’ve ever lived through has been amid a sold-out crowd."

So how do you turn your night in front of a small crowd into something special? I spoke with Lynn and a dozen other indie artists about this, and they revealed their secrets for turning those shows into great times, using them as opportunities to create superfans, and even how they’ve been able to move merch despite low turnouts.

Top 10 Qualities to Look for in a Tourmate

According to Shinobi Ninja, you learn a lot about your friends when you go on tour with them. (Image via Wikimedia Commons; used under Creative Commons)

"Being on tour a big fat gift," extols C Bock of the rock band Revolt Revolt. "[It’s] one of the best parts of being a musician – a ticket to see the world in a way not many others get to. Every day is a new day, and you never know exactly what you are going to get. Other than the band, your songs, and the wheels beneath you, everything is new, coming at you full speed."

Touring is clearly a heck of an experience, but what kind of person do you want by your side for those long trips around the country – or the world? I asked half a dozen artists about this, and they replied with the following 10 qualities they look for in a tourmate.

The Indie Artist’s Guide to Talking Politics on Social Media

Photo by Michael Vadon via Wikimedia Commons

It's an election year, and whether you’re feeling the Bern or you’re down with the GOP, chances are you have an opinion about what’s going on in American politics. The first thing a lot of artists do when they have a strong feeling about something political is hop on social media and let the world know what’s on their minds. Before you send that tweet or post that Facebook status, however, you should think about the best ways to word those posts, and all the potential ramifications your posts may have.

I spoke with 10 indie artists on this subject to get their take on talking politics on social media and, from those conversations, came up with this eight-step guide.

9 Ways to Impress a Venue Talent Buyer, Even if You Can't Pack the House

NYC’s herMajesty can pack Pianos, but even if you aren’t on that level yet, there’s plenty you can do that can help put you on that stage. (Photo by Adam Bernard)

Everyone knows filling a venue to capacity, whether it fits 50 or 500, is the best way to endear yourself to a venue’s talent buyer, but not all artists are at a point in their careers where they can do that. How can an artist who’s just starting to build a fanbase get on those stages and develop those relationships with venues?

I spoke with eight venue talent buyers from around the country to find out what qualities make an artist someone they like to book, even if the artist might not be the biggest draw. According to these experts, here’s what you need to do.