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Why They're Not Accepting Your Unsolicited Material

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If you've been pitching your demos long enough, you've surely seen something to this effect: “No unsolicited material.” But what does this mean? Simply put, if someone didn't ask for it or it didn't come through someone he or she knows, you're wasting your time. At best, you might get it back with “refused - return to sender” on it (if you've sent it physically). At worst – and more typically – it winds up in the trash.

These music executives aren't doing this because they're heartless and want to crush your dreams – it makes very real sense. Here's why.

Yes, There Is a Proper Way to Follow Up After You've Been Rejected

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It's always tough to get rejected, but how you react to it can often mean the difference between success and failure. Sometimes, a “no” isn't a “no,” it's just a “not right now.” Unfortunately, many aspiring artists assume that door is closed forever and move on without another thought.

An important aspect of the music industry, though, is establishing and maintaining connections – perhaps those who said "no" can't help you today. But who knows? Maybe six months from now, something will change. Here is how to follow up after you've been rejected – it might turn a "no" into an opportunity after all.

3 Ways to Get Your Song Heard and Cut by an Artist

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Back before the advent of downloads, the music business was a different place. It didn't take much to get your song heard, at least in Nashville. Getting a song cut – particularly a single – was a lot harder, of course, but the truth is, now it's harder than ever. Here are three ways to actually get a cut – and what is actually involved with each.

Musician Life

Aug 28, 2017 06:00 AM

Dan Reifsnyder

5 Indicators of Whether You're an Amateur or a Pro Musician

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Being a pro – or not – doesn't depend on how many shows you perform a year, how much money you earn, or even how talented you are. It is 100 percent one thing: mindset. I've played with amateur musicians who had the heart of a pro and vice versa. The good news is that this mindset can be learned.

How to Finally Break Up With a Co-Writer

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Sometimes, it's time to pull the plug on a relationship. It happens all the time, and co-writing is no different. Even the best co-writing relationships can go sour (think Lennon and McCartney, for instance), and it's wise to think about an exit strategy if things are looking bleak.

Breaking up can be difficult for obvious reasons, whether it's with a co-writer or significant other, and you may notice some parallels between the two. Sharing your creative side with someone and pouring energy into a project can certainly be a bonding experience. Not to mention the fact that co-writers often know quite a bit about each other, especially if they've been at it a long time.

Regardless of the stage of your writing relationship, here are three ways you can let your partner down in the most professional and kind way possible.