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How to Get Your Music Featured on Blogs, Part 5: Why the Follow-Up is More Important Than Your First Email

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A version of this article originally appeared on Sunshine Promotion.

Catch up on the first four parts of this series to:

 

There are many facets of a successful music publicity campaign, but among the most common questions I hear from newer artists are about how they can promote their music independently and get it covered on music blogs. After you've started to get coverage for a single or music video from your new album, it's time to follow up, leverage that coverage into bigger placements, and sometimes, deal with rejection.

How to Get Your Music Featured on Blogs, Part 4: Crafting Your Email Pitch (2 Examples Included!)

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A version of this article originally appeared on Sunshine Promotion.

 

Catch up on the first three parts of this series to learn the truth about what bloggers are actually looking for, a checklist of what to send to maximize your chances of coverage, and when to take each step of your press campaign.

There are many facets of a successful music publicity campaign, but among the most common questions I hear from newer artists are about how they can promote their music independently and get it covered on music blogs. In this post, we'll look at where to find music blogs to email and what your emails should look like for best results.

How to Get Your Music Featured on Blogs, Part 3: The 16-Week Schedule You Need

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A version of this article originally appeared on Sunshine Promotion.

 

Catch up on parts one and two of this series to learn the truth about what bloggers are actually looking for and exactly what to send them to maximize your chances of coverage.

Alright, so we've talked about why music blogs write about what they do, why you shouldn't be eager to put your music out there without some planning, why exclusivity matters, what kinds of stories you should be telling, and where your music should be hosted. Phew! What's next? I've put together an album release schedule of sorts that will help you organize your thoughts and plans to successfully release your music. I like to take things slowly to not get overwhelmed by the size of a full campaign.

How to Get Your Music Featured on Blogs, Part 2: A Checklist of Exactly What to Send Writers

Fleet Foxes made sure journalists knew the story behind Helplessness Blues. (Image via fleetfoxes.com)

A version of this article originally appeared on Sunshine Promotion.

 

If you missed part one of this series, click here to learn the truth about what bloggers are actually looking for, and why pitching Pitchfork might not be the best step right away.

Of course, your completed album is the most valuable thing you have until someone finally writes about it, but let's take a moment to see what kind of assets (pieces of content) you'll need to have for a "traditional" press campaign. Having the following pieces of information available will greatly increase your likelihood of getting coverage. The reason? Simply put, it makes it look like you have your shit together.

How to Get Your Music Featured on Blogs, Part 1: What Are Bloggers Actually Looking For?

Image via flickr.com

A version of this article originally appeared on Sunshine Promotion.

 

There are many facets of a successful music publicity campaign, but among the most common questions from newer artists are how they can promote their music independently and get it covered on music blogs. Since many new artists often don't have the money to embark on national tours, advertise on major music outlets, or sometimes even print physical copies of their own albums, getting coverage on music blogs (both local and national) is the best way for them to spread the word about the music they're creating.