Expert Music Career Advice For DIY Musicians

How to Finally Break Up With a Co-Writer

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Sometimes, it's time to pull the plug on a relationship. It happens all the time, and co-writing is no different. Even the best co-writing relationships can go sour (think Lennon and McCartney, for instance), and it's wise to think about an exit strategy if things are looking bleak.

Breaking up can be difficult for obvious reasons, whether it's with a co-writer or significant other, and you may notice some parallels between the two. Sharing your creative side with someone and pouring energy into a project can certainly be a bonding experience. Not to mention the fact that co-writers often know quite a bit about each other, especially if they've been at it a long time.

Regardless of the stage of your writing relationship, here are three ways you can let your partner down in the most professional and kind way possible.

1. Be direct

This is by far the most difficult option, but I find it's usually the best. Letting someone know – kindly, but firmly – where you stand often clears the air very quickly and begets the least amount of negativity in the long term.

If you're unsure of what to say, try some variation of the following: “I'm sorry, I just don't feel we're working well together right now – our artistic sensibilities are just too different.” The other person may ask questions about your decision – in fact, that's likely.

Your level of honesty depends on your relationship. If you're too honest, it could piss off him or her. At the same time, if there's a particular reason (maybe he or she needs to work on listening to his or her co-writers or brush up on his or her lyrical chops), that person deserve the chance to fix it for the future. Your (now former) partner may even appreciate it, albeit in hindsight.

Keeping someone as a friend after being direct can often prove difficult, but I suggest trying to leave a door open. You never know where either of you will find yourselves in the future, and you may change your mind about working with him or her down the road.

Offer to hang out in a non-writing setting sometime. Send him or her a text or an email every once in awhile or reach out on social media. You can never have too many friends in this industry, and it's always smart to do your best to avoid creating grudges.

2. Avoid writing together

I've seen this done a lot to varying effect. If you're not comfortable with the direct approach, this option may be more diplomatic. A word of warning, though: It can take longer and has the potential to create bad feelings if you don't do it right.

The simplest way to go about this is to be busy. It can help if you really are swamped with work or working on other projects. Say you can't write at the moment, but you'll revisit in a few months. This serves two purposes: First, it lets everything cool off. You're not writing together as often and maybe talking less. It can soften the blow for the eventual “breakup.”

Second, it can give you time and space to gather your thoughts about writing together. Perhaps you're just getting burned out. If so, you can return to the project in a few weeks or months since you haven't officially burned any bridges.

If you still decide you two don't make the best writing team, continue to be non-committal about making time to get together. Most people either get the idea and drop it or forget about it entirely. (After all, your partner probably has a busy life, too.) If he or she presses, be honest and give an honest answer. And with the benefit of time away, he or she just may come to agree that it's the best thing.

A word of warning: Don't lie. In other words, don't tell the other person you're not feeling very creative when it's obvious you're writing every day. If anything rings untrue – or worse, is an outright falsehood  it will be taken personally and you'll look pretty scummy... the very thing you want to avoid.

3. Ghost

This is, by far, my least favorite option  because it leaves the most room for hurt feelings and burned bridges. Sometimes, though, it's the only option – especially if your co-writer isn't getting the hint or has put you in an uncomfortable, awkward, or dangerous situation (unwanted sexual advances, illegal activity, or just being generally sketchy).

In that case, feel free to ghost and ghost liberally. For those who don't know what "ghosting" is, it's sudden and complete radio silence. You can go as far as blocking the other person on social media or from your phone, and that may be necessary depending on what he or she has done. Save this for all but the most serious situations – it will unquestionably end your relationship (professional or otherwise) and potentially sour any mutual contacts you have.

Be wary of ghosting too often, however – if done too much, you will appear to be flaky and unreliable (or possibly unstable), and people will be reluctant to work with you.

 

As Paul Simon once said, there are 50 ways to leave your lover, and that goes for co-writing relationships, too. These are just some of the most common and effective ways I've found. With any luck, though, you'll never need to use them.

 

Next up: 3 Red Flags That a Co-Write Just Isn't Working

 

Daniel Reifsnyder is a Nashville-based, Grammy-nominated songwriter, having started his musical journey at the age of three. In addition to being an accomplished commercial actor, his voice can be heard on The Magic School Bus theme song and in Home Alone 2. Throughout his career, he has had the honor of working with the likes of Michael Jackson and Little Richard among many others. He is a regular contributor to several music-related blogs, including his own.

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