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7 Ways All Musicians Can Play Every Show Like a Professional

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Most musicians are focused only on the music  and rightfully so. If you don't play a great show, you're not going to win over fans or be asked back to the venue. But more than being a great band, you want to be taken seriously. Here are seven ways you can step up your game and be a more professional musician.

6 Ways to Gently Nudge Fans About Buying Tickets to an Upcoming Show

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Concerts are one of the primary ways you’re going to make money as a musician, so while it can be exhausting to promote all of your shows over and over, it’s what you have to do to stay in business. In fact, you’ll probably end up spending more time promoting concerts and pushing tickets than actually playing onstage!

After initially releasing dates and announcing a tour, how do you make sure you sell as many tickets as possible? Social media will quickly become your best friend, so here are six helpful tactics that can help you sell, sell, sell!

5 Live Show Investments (Besides Gear) That Will Elevate Your Shows

Get a fog machine. Fog machines rule. (Image via Stocksnap.io)

When we talk about a live-show setup, we're usually referring to gear, obviously. But there's actually more you can do to ensure a memorable performance. Sounding good is the bulk of the battle, of course, but looking good counts for something, too.

4 Surefire Ways to Increase Your Turnout at Gigs

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How to Properly Advance Your Shows (And Why It's a Must Every Time)

Ari Herstand. (Photo by Gadi Rouache)

This is a guest post by Ari Herstand, author of How to Make It in the New Music Business and originally appeared on Ari’s Take.

 

A friend of mine with a good following in LA just told me how she showed up to her show last night only to find out that the venue had canceled it without her knowledge. Another touring artist I know discovered just two days before her LA stop that the promoter had a miscommunication with the venue and double booked the night with a wedding (after selling 200 advance tickets online).

I can't tell you how many horror stories I've heard (and experienced) where the venue and artist were on two completely separate pages about the show's details – and sometimes two completely separate calendars.

How do you prevent these catastrophes from happening? Advance the show!