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The 3 Rules You Need to Survive in Nashville

Photo by Alex Ford via Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Nashville can be a strange place. Many people come from all over the world jump in with both feet and think they'll be discovered in six months at the latest. In the meantime, they fail to understand the culture and/or why they aren't welcomed with open arms.

Some of it may have to do with talent, but some of it may have to do with breaking the unspoken rules of Nashville without realizing it. Here are just a few to keep in mind the next time you visit Music City.

3 Surefire Signs You're Overwriting That Song

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You've been hacking away at this song for weeks, and it's still not right. Or maybe it's perfect. It's hard to tell. The point is, you're just too close to it to see the big picture and you'rein danger of overwriting.

If you've been writing for any length of time, you've no doubt encountered this issue. It's something that can really sneak up on even the most seasoned of writers, though – so here are a few tips to help you recognize it.

Recording, Honing Your Craft

Nov 10, 2016 06:00 AM

Rob Lanterman

5 Ways to Ensure Your Band Will Kill It in the Studio

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Before you enter the studio to share your music with the world, keep in mind that a tight practice or live set may not be enough. There are things that come out on record that you might not notice beforehand but will throw the listener for a loop (and I mean that in a bad way).

When Less Is More: 3 Reasons Why Smaller Arrangements Can Make Your Tracks Sound Bigger

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Everyone wants their studio tracks to sound “huge.” In an effort to achieve “hugeness,” many of us follow the obvious path of adding more and more things to our arrangements. If two guitars sound big, then four guitars should sound even bigger, right?

While this makes sense in principle, the results can be paradoxical; often what we achieve by adding more elements to a track isn't a bigger sound but a smaller one.

How does this work? Here are a few examples of some situations when removing elements from your tracks can lead to a fuller sound.

Recording, Honing Your Craft

Nov 4, 2016 06:00 AM

Hugh McIntyre

The 7 Essential Musical Credits You Need to Keep Track Of

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If you're gearing up to make some new music and release an album, make sure you’re keeping proper notes and writing down everyone who was involved with every bit of the album-making process as you go along. Trying to look back later and remember every place and name is incredibly difficult.

You might not think it’s that big of a deal, but if you fail to properly credit someone for their work, you run the risk of alienating that person, losing a contact, and even getting yourself into some legal troubles. While you're working, follow this checklist to make sure you're keeping track of every credit.