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4 Things Every Blogger Wants You to Know About Music Publicity

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Doing your own PR is hard, there’s no way around that. But when your budget is tight or you just want the experience (which I highly recommend to all artists when they first start out), knowing how to put together a strong PR campaign is a must. While there’s a lot to learn through trial and error, we wanted to offer you a bit of a cheat sheet when it comes to contacting blogs and pitching your music to the masses.

Check out four tips for submitting to blogs — straight from the mouths of bloggers — below.

7 Best Indie Music Blogs to Pitch Right Now

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Major media outlets aren’t exclusive to major-label sounds anymore, but it’s still not typical for those sites to bet on brand-new or largely unheard-of artists and bands – no matter how compelling their music may be.

And while playlist culture and social media have become integral to music discovery, dedicated music lovers are still looking to independent music blogs as guides through uncharted sonic territory. Blogs are still touting vast readerships and breaking emerging artists – and the best of them are undoubtedly being read by writers and editors of those powerhouse music sites, too.

We’ve rounded up seven blogs that are both consistent in churning out stellar content and remain open to receiving submissions from independent artists and bands. Genre-wise, there’s a bit of everything here, and within each site there’s often multiple ways to get featured – good luck!

6 Important Contacts to Add to Your Band's Website

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Some musicians think websites in the age of social media are a relic of the past, but I would argue that they’re still important and that they're worth the time and potential expense. There's so much you can do with a website that can’t be done on Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook.

One of the many essential pages you should have built into your website is the contact page. At first glance, you might think it would be mostly empty other than one email address, but there's so much more you can add that benefits you as a working artist.

5 Ways to Engage Fans With Facebook Live

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As someone who has always been a little camera shy, I completely understand the resistance to embracing all that Facebook Live has to offer. I mean, for one thing, it’s live, so you can’t edit it to perfection. (Did I mention this is also a major plus?)

Second, you can feel a little silly talking to an audience you can’t see and hoping (trusting) they’ll interact with you either as the broadcast goes out live or when they watch the replay. Tip: Many people tend to watch and comment on replays, so don’t be discouraged if you don’t get a huge turnout straight away.

But the fact remains that as Facebook continues to push Live to its users, the potential for growing your audience and engaging fans becomes all the more important. Because we know it can be a little nerve-wracking, here are a five ways to get started.

5 Ways to Make Fans Happy with Your Social Media Content


Do fans really need to see your coffee on social media every morning? Image via Pixabay.

Social media can make us miserable – you've likely read about studies that prove this, or you've figured it out for yourself through that sinking, self-loathing feeling that sometimes creeps in after too much scrolling past people's accomplishments and perfectly angled photos.

But there are also reports on how social media can make us feel closer to friends, which makes us happier – so how can bands and artists channel that positivity, rather than contribute to the potential sadness of their fans?