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How to Find a Music Publicist You Can Trust

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You’ve decided you need a music publicist you can trust to help you promote your next album release. You’re nervous. There are stories you’ve heard from bands who hired a publicist who took their money and disappeared, or maybe the publicist stuck around but made huge promises they simply couldn’t deliver.

The result? Thousands of dollars down the drain.

I’m not telling you this to scare you, but to prepare you to hire a publicist you can trust so it doesn’t happen to you. There’s always some sort of inherent risk in hiring a music publicist, but there are also some things you can do to increase the chances of hiring the right publicist for your band’s needs — and one you ultimately trust.

4 Phrases Music Journalists Are Tired of Hearing

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Most music journalists who have been writing and reviewing tunes for any real length of time see their email inboxes flooded with hundreds of requests every day. Publicists, managers, and more than a few artists themselves all send pitches that will hopefully turn into stories on blogs and in magazines.

Many writers don’t mind receiving these messages — it’s the nature of the business, after all — but there are a handful of turns of phrase that have been overused and beaten to death by this point, and it’s about time to retire them. Before you hit send on your next pitch, make sure none of these four words/phrases are included.

How to Get More Out of Articles Written About Your Band

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One of the toughest things you'll need to do in your musical career is attract the attention of people in the media. The problem is, they're inundated with requests all day, every day from publicists, managers, record labels, and even musicians themselves for quick write-ups and reviews of new music. A full-time writer may receive hundreds of emails a day, and most barely get around to opening a small percentage of those.

The chances of a new artist being highlighted by a publication of any sort are very slim, and that’s what makes every single bit of press that much more impressive (bad pun intended).

4 Things Music Journalists Expect After Reviewing Your Album

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It finally happened: that hot music blog called your album "inspired" and urged its voracious readers to give it a listen. You do a happy dance and text your mom to tell her you're on your way to bonafide rockstar status. This one 300-word post has made your entire day, week, and month.

But before you get too swept away by seeing your band's name in print, don't forget whose fingers typed it. You likely either cold called the writer or blog, worked with a publicist or PR agency to facilitate the review, or had a friend of a friend pass along your music to his or her music journalist pal.

Whatever route the review took to get written, pause your celebrations and make sure these four things are on your immediate to-do list.

4 Angles to Generate Media Interest That You Probably Haven't Tried Before

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You made a great album, and you’re sure every blogger in the world is going to jump at the chance to cover you. Unfortunately, that’s not how it works. Media folks consider at a variety of factors when determining whether to cover a band, and the music itself is just a small piece.

In every case of trying to drum up interest, it’s about connecting to something, or someone, bigger than your band's current state. Rolling Stone may not be interested in covering you if you only have 260 followers on Facebook and one like per 10 posts. If you connect with a band, producer, or festival that has a larger following or the media is already familiar with, however, you may also have an angle that could pique interest.

Below are four ways you can create more interest in your music and potentially influence a media outlet to cover your band.