<iframe src="//www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-TMFBBP" height="0" width="0" style="display:none;visibility:hidden"> Sonicbids Blog - Music Career Advice and Gigs | press
Expert Music Career Advice For DIY Musicians
4 Times You Shouldn't Take the Gig
The Number One Mistake Bands Make Right After Booking a Gig
The Ultimate EQ Cheat Sheet for Every Common Instrument
15 Reality Checks Young Artists Need to Hear

4 Steps to Take When Music Bloggers Don't Respond

Image via Shutterstock

As a band, you may think it’s a lost cause to pitch blogs directly. Maybe you’ve tried in the past only to receive a zero response rate. Or maybe you think, "What’s the point?" because they won’t want to hear from you anyway.

Yes, a publicist who has relationships can help gain interest with media outlets, but it doesn’t mean it’s impossible to do it on your own. Even with relationships, as a seasoned publicist, I sometimes have to go back five or six times before I receive a response.

Below are a few tips we use when building a new relationship when all else fails.

How to Get Your Music Featured on Bandcamp

Image via stocksnap.io

Editorial at Bandcamp has been a thing since 2013, but right now the focus on (and following of) their content is sharper than ever. For the unfamiliar, music criticism isn't their bag; the mission instead is to spotlight the best of the hundreds of thousands of bands and artists on the platform.

The qualifying criteria aren't cut and dried, of course. There's no fixed formula for getting your music featured on Bandcamp, and that's actually a good thing.

Bands: You Should Have These 7 Things Ready to Go the Moment a Writer Asks

Image via Shutterstock

Whenever you get the attention of someone in the media, it’s as if lightning has struck. So many writers are flooded with music and are busier than ever, so if you do manage to get someone to listen to your work and they deem it good enough to write about, make sure you're ready for them and for this opportunity.

That means having all your ducks in a row before you even approach anybody. What does “having all your ducks in a row” look like in this situation? In my opinion as a music writer, it means that you've sent me everything I will need in order to post something excellent about you, your band, and the music you’ve just released.

The Argument For Pitching Smaller Blogs (And Leaving the Larger Ones for Later)

Image via Shutterstock

Every musician dreams of being featured in the big, respected magazines and blogs, and surely even being mentioned can help your career. That’s a great dream, and there's no problem with having it, but it’s also good to be realistic at the same time. Remaining somewhat grounded while still having high aspirations can be the best way to get where you want to go.

You’re probably not going to want to hear this, but pitching some of the major outlets – whether it’s you doing the reaching out or a publicist you've hired – when it’s far too early in your career can not only be a waste of time, money, and effort, but it could actually be detrimental to your future prospects.

Music Business 101, press, PR

Aug 25, 2016 10:00 AM

Hugh McIntyre

3 Things Any Good Music Publicist Will Give You if You Ask

Image via Shutterstock

Before becoming a full-time writer, I worked in PR for a short period of time. Though I wasn’t anywhere near the music industry, my months repping people and brands taught me what can be promised by publicists and what can’t. My boss at the time used to always tell potential clients that any company that promises certain coverage is lying and shouldn't be trusted, and he was right.

Some people are confused about this, so I’d like to share what I believe you can (and should) demand from your music PR team, and why.