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What Movies Got Right About Streaming is Everything Music Got Wrong [Opinion]

All images via haulixdaily.com

This article originally appeared on Haulix Daily.

 

Before I dive too deep into this piece, I want to stress that I am a huge supporter of streaming services in general. The age of streaming has made it possible for artists at every level to continue making money on older releases long after consumer interest in purchasing those titles has been depleted.

We can argue all day about whether or not the royalty rate is acceptable (it’s not), but that is another conversation for another time. Streaming provides a steady stream of income for artists even when they have nothing new to promote, which in turn makes it possible for more artists to continue creating even when their latest release is less than well received by the general public.

Okay? Okay.

The more I think about the digital age and how it has impacted the entertainment industry as a whole, the more I realize that the film industry may have handled the war against piracy far better than those working in music. Unless a film is being released on VOD (video on demand), those interested in seeing a new title still have to buy a ticket and visit a theater in order to experience the film immediately following its release.

Pandora is Taking Steps to Make Sure Artists Are Paid Fairly and Transparently for Streams

Image via Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Nearly every day, the music industry suggests that music streaming and subscription services are public enemy number one for musicians. We've seen the salaries of the top dogs at these major service providers, and it's no surprise that the CEOs and employees are earning better wages than the artists their platforms stream. By the way headlines frame it, making music and money seems dismal for independent artists. But Pandora's new on-demand subscription service may be the catalyst that starts to change that.

The launch of the internet radio platform's subscription service has been long awaited by music fans, and as Pandora approaches the launch, new goals are being laid out for the service. Pandora is aiming to assure that artists get fair and transparent royalties, unlike some of their predecessors and competitors in the streaming world.

Beatport Shuts Down Streaming Service: What Does This Mean for the Music Industry?

Image via Shutterstock

On May 10, 2016, Beatport, the online music store primarily aimed at EDM fans, posted a notice to fans on its blog announcing that it will be shutting down its streaming services, Beatport News, its app, and its events section. This comes at a tumultuous time in the music industry when the fate of all streaming services, and maybe the industry in general, are uncertain.

Is 'All in One' Going to Be the New Norm for Streaming?

Image via dailyrindblog.com

This article originally appeared on The Daily Rind.

 

No doubt we’ve all written and read countless articles about streaming. There will always be those who declare it to be the shotgun-wielding savior of the music industry, singlehandedly delivering us to greener pastures and fatter pockets, and those who declare it to be nothing more than the final fart of a rotting corpse to which we dedicate so much of our professional lives. So I won’t throw my two cents into the mix. I do, however, want to address what could be interpreted as the gentle shift towards providing music consumers with a one-stop shop for all of their consumption needs – in particular, the live music space and ticketing.

Where Does Tidal Stand After 12 Months Compared to Other Streaming Services? [Chart]

Image via Wikimedia Commons / CC BY 2.0

It's hard to believe it's been a whole year since Jay-Z launched music-streaming service Tidal. Poised to potentially take over the digital sector of the music industry (like he's pretty much taken over every other realm, let's be honest), many people were immediately skeptical of Jay's grand ambitions, and for good reason. How would Tidal compete with the likes of Spotify and Apple Music?

So, the question remains: in its first year, how did Tidal do exactly? Despite big-time releases from artists like Rihanna and Kanye West, how does it rank against the big guys? Check out the infographic below from Statista and find out!