Expert Music Career Advice For DIY Musicians
6 Ways to Kill Your Music Career
5 Things You Should Always Do After Playing a Gig
14 Ways to Make Money From One Song
5 Things That Smart Musicians Do Every Day

How Indie Band Shark Week Got to Play SXSW and CMJ

Photo by Austin Crittendon

With surf, '70s punk, garage rock, and pop influences, Shark Week's sound is creating waves. After tackling both SXSW and CMJ, the Washington, DC-based group has been continously broadening their horizons, and are now preparing to release their first full-length album, Beach Fuzz. Frontman Ryan Hunter Mitchell spoke with us about the recording process of Beach Fuzz, how they got major festival opportunities, and what lies ahead for the band.

6 Things You Need to Know About Getting Your Songs Placed in Video Games

Paul McCartney composed "Hope for the Future" for Destiny and released it as a single and video earlier this month. (Image via dualshockers.com)

Musicians who want to gain more fans used to dream about being featured on the soundtrack of a film or TV show. That ambition is still relevant, except that today, video games are a bigger deal than Hollywood  and have been for a while now. This means that getting your music into a video game can be tougher than landing a song in a film. The struggle is worth it, though. Video games make more money than movies, and games are so successful that the gaming industry is growing four times faster than the US economy. Sounds strange, but it's true.

So, wondering how you can get in on the action? Here are six tips and answers to questions you may have about getting your music in a video game.

sonicbids, video, office gig

Dec 18, 2014 12:00 PM

Amy D'Aureli

Watch Blue Light Bandits Play Our Latest Sonicbids Office Gig

Image via bluelightbandits.com

Blue Light Bandits recently graced our Sonicbids office with a dreamy set of songs from their latest EP, The BLB Demo.

3 Reasons Why Comparisons Hurt Your Music Career (And How to Stop)

Image via theguardian.com

When she removed her entire catalog from Spotify, Taylor Swift made musicians of all types begin discussing the effects of streaming on our industry. Her exit from Spotify also resulted in articles, blog posts, and calls from my clients asking if they should do the same thing.

"Should we still be on Spotify?"

"Should we be more careful about streaming?"

My answer: It depends – because you aren't Taylor Swift. You're a unique artist with unique marketing and business needs. Your formula for success won't be the same as anyone else's, especially not a multi-platinum recording artist's. 

Now, this article isn't about the good and evil of streaming music – that's a completely different topic on which novels can be written. This is about the self-imposed obstacles that will inevitably occur if you decide to plot your business moves solely based on what other musicians do. Comparisons are hurting your career and stunting your growth – and here's why.

OPPORTUNITY: How to Book a Gig at Wonder Bar in Boston

Image via wonderbarboston.com

Boston-based concert production, marketing, and booking agency The Brain Trust is now officially booking talent for Wonder Bar in Boston! They're looking for emerging acts to feature at upcoming shows throughout the winter, and they're accepting applications from Sonicbids artists now.