Expert Music Career Advice For DIY Musicians
4 Times You Shouldn't Take the Gig
The Number One Mistake Bands Make Right After Booking a Gig
The Ultimate EQ Cheat Sheet for Every Common Instrument
15 Reality Checks Young Artists Need to Hear

4 Tips to Successfully Build Your Personal Music Brand

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There's so much more to being a professional musician than just creating and playing music. If you want to make it in this business, you’ve got to stand out from the crowd, and when it comes to musicians, that’s tough. Some people go overboard with insane costumes and exaggerated personalities, but that’s hard to pull off. Sure, it’s worked for some, but if you’re not trying to wear a mask onstage or be batshit crazy online, you’re going to have to find something that works for you.

Here Are the Dead Simple Ways to Improve Your Sound in the Studio, Instrument by Instrument

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Maybe you’ve spent hundreds of hours in the same room, rehearsing your material. Perhaps you’ve performed dozens of times, on different stages, using the same gear. You’re used to your sound. You like it. But now you’re in the studio and something just doesn’t seem right. What’s the problem?

It’s no surprise when things that were once okay suddenly sound unacceptable in the studio context. For one, you’ve never scrutinized things so closely before. You’re paying attention to every detail, and some things aren’t up to par. Also, you’re hearing things in a different room, possibly though unfamiliar monitor speakers or headphones.

5 of the Worst Ways to Get a Music Journalist's Attention

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Getting the attention of music journalists is a struggle for almost everybody in the industry, no matter how popular the artist. There are only so many outlets and so many writers, and there are hundreds of thousands of people trying to get them to listen to their latest creations.

It’s tough, but to those thinking they should do whatever it takes to grab even just a fraction of someone’s attention: think again. There are bad ideas and terrible ways to reach out to writers, and while you may think they’ll give you an advantage, they probably won’t, and they may hurt your chances instead.

5 Great Music Venues in the Portland Area to Check Out for Your Next Pacific Northwest Tour

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The Pacific Northwest of the US is amazing for so many different reasons: the mountains, the natural history, and definitely the music. I mean, Seattle alone was home to Kurt Cobain, Quincy Jones, and Jimi Hendrix. I think those three are enough to convince you that this region is one of the best for music scenes.

But with the famed names aside, Oregon has much to offer for everyone in the music industry, especially Portland. Portland prides itself on its eclectic counterculture, amazing food, and inclusiveness. There's just about anything for anyone in Portland, including the up-and-coming and breakthrough musicians.

Portland's wide variety of venues and performance spaces makes it a great city to hit up for a tour or even just as you're passing through. From historical venues to chill coffee houses, here are just some of the venues in Portland and surrounding areas you should check out for the next time you plan to head out on a tour.

Why Every Songwriter Should Have a Hookbook

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If you've been creative for any length of time, you've noticed that things tend to ebb and flow. You can have an incredibly productive month (or two, or three) and then be tapped out for ideas for a little while. It happens to everybody. Pro writers are able to sidestep that issue by having something called a “hookbook.” A hook is nothing more than an idea – usually a song title, but it could be a guitar lick or melody line. Here's what you need to know about starting your very own hookbook.