Expert Music Career Advice For DIY Musicians
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Want To Be A Tour Manager? Here's Advice From 4 Industry Pros

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Tour life. It’s something most bands dream about, but what about balancing your musical ambitions with the logistical requirements of planning and preparing for life on the road? Is it even possible for an artist to become a tour manager, too?

Before You Launch Your Band's Website, Do These 5 Things

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Your website is the ultimate statement of your personal brand. It’s the home base for all of your music, media, contact info, latest news, and (hopefully) access to sign up to your newsletter.

While many musicians stress out over every detail of an impending music release, many fail to take the same precautions when it comes to their websites. Cutting corners and launching a website without much forethought can lead to a costly trail of redesigns, relaunches, and "under construction” notices.

Performing, Honing Your Craft

Aug 14, 2017 06:00 AM

Sam Friedman

8 Ways to Perform With a Backing Track (and Still Engage Your Audience)

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This article originally appeared on Soundfly.

 

From pop to hip-hop to jazz, musicians in every genre rely heavily on electronic production today. If you turn on any commercial radio station around the country, you’re pretty much guaranteed to hear more electronic drums than physical acoustic drums. Guitar-driven music has begun to shed its 20th-century popularity, and, subsequently, electronic music is taking over everything.

Video: How to Mix Background Vocals

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The Argument for Longform Content on YouTube

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Over the years, attention spans have been whittled down, and every industry has been forced to find a way to keep people watching, reading, listening, or otherwise hooked. As a result, a lot of content has become shorter.

At the same time, a few people have learned how to make longer length content work for them, because not everything needs to become more compacted. You can learn a thing or two from them, and you should consider dabbling in longer content from time to time.

The best place to experiment is on your YouTube channel. If you're used to posting short videos or snippets, thinking your fans only want 30 seconds of you at a time, here are three great reasons to post a longer video ASAP.