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7 of the Best Collaborative Music-Making Apps for 2019

All images via flypaper.soundfly.comA version of this article originally appeared on Soundfly.

 

In the last few years, so many collaborative music-making apps have emerged on the market due to recent developments in cloud-storage capacity, faster internet connections, and stronger mobile networks, but also because of the growing fundamental need for artists, producers, and engineers to interact together creatively.

The internet is good at a lot of things, but it stinks at getting us beyond our bubble and interacting with the outside world, so these apps hone in on one of the things the internet is best at: connecting us with an enormous number of potential colleagues from all over the globe. 

Here’s a list of six of our favorite apps that make music collaboration simple, straightforward, and fun, and they each do it in a different way.

Advice for Moving Up and Not Sliding Off a Popular Playlist

Image via Shutterstock

This article originally appeared on the AWAL Blog.

 

Whether it’s A-List: Hip-Hop, mint, Pop Hitlist, or the feeder playlists that help drive them, editorial curation continues to transform music for both artists and fans. (The staff experts and everyday users of Spotify, Apple Music, YouTube, Tidal, SoundCloud have generated billions of collections between them.)  

Landing on a major playlist creates awareness and engagement around tracks. Previously, we’ve talked about the best tips to get added to a playlist… but what happens after that? Is there a way to help your tracks rise and stay on a playlist longer?

10 Great Mobile Apps That Help Me (and You) Create Awesome Music from Scratch

Image via Shutterstock

This article originally appeared on Soundfly.

 

For such a long time, I resisted using apps to make music. I thought they must just be crappy, tiny versions of what they’re attempting to emulate (soft synthesizers, DAWs, digital instruments), or lame tools for musicians younger than I. Well, turns out I was wrong.

There are some absolutely amazing apps out there to help you make music on the bus, on the edge of a waterfall, or wherever you are when inspiration strikes. They sound so good, they can do so much, and best of all, they’re all pretty cheap or even free. Even the most expensive one on the below list, the iMPC Pro, is well worth its $25 price tag.

3 Easy, Flexible Options to Build Music Websites for Bands

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Most bands and artists are scattered all over the internet: music on Bandcamp, photos on Instagram, band-approved memes on Facebook, funny commentary on Twitter, show listings on Bandsintown, and so forth. Of course, that’s just one example out of the endless possible combinations. It’s important to maintain a presence on all of those sites – so why are websites for bands even necessary?

The fact that there’s content in so many places is the very reason to offer a consolidated, simplified version of everything available. Build a website, and you’ll streamline the discovery process for booking agents and press who want to see it all. Fans, both existing and new, can also appreciate that, for once, they won’t be shuffling between multiple sites as they try to keep up with or learn about the music they love.

How It's Easier Than Ever to End Up on a Spotify Playlist

Image via Pixabay

Before the digital age, artists had to contend with gatekeepers – publishers, labels, radio stations, etc. – before getting their music in the hands of fans. These days, artists have ready access to digital platforms to reach out and get new listeners.

Probably the holy grail of these is Spotify, which has changed the game. It's even gotten the usually change-averse labels to sit up and take notice – PR reps are now pitching directly to tastemakers, much like they do with radio stations.