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4 Things Music Journalists Expect After Reviewing Your Album

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It finally happened: that hot music blog called your album "inspired" and urged its voracious readers to give it a listen. You do a happy dance and text your mom to tell her you're on your way to bonafide rockstar status. This one 300-word post has made your entire day, week, and month.

But before you get too swept away by seeing your band's name in print, don't forget whose fingers typed it. You likely either cold called the writer or blog, worked with a publicist or PR agency to facilitate the review, or had a friend of a friend pass along your music to his or her music journalist pal.

Whatever route the review took to get written, pause your celebrations and make sure these four things are on your immediate to-do list.

4 Angles to Generate Media Interest That You Probably Haven't Tried Before

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You made a great album, and you’re sure every blogger in the world is going to jump at the chance to cover you. Unfortunately, that’s not how it works. Media folks consider at a variety of factors when determining whether to cover a band, and the music itself is just a small piece.

In every case of trying to drum up interest, it’s about connecting to something, or someone, bigger than your band's current state. Rolling Stone may not be interested in covering you if you only have 260 followers on Facebook and one like per 10 posts. If you connect with a band, producer, or festival that has a larger following or the media is already familiar with, however, you may also have an angle that could pique interest.

Below are four ways you can create more interest in your music and potentially influence a media outlet to cover your band.

8 Famous Musicians Who Waited Forever to Quit Their Day Jobs

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If you’re working a day job to fund your music career, you may feel like you haven’t “made it” yet as a real musician. But when you consider the paths of many famous musicians, you’ll notice that working a “regular job” while pursuing music on the side is something that many now-iconic artists have done.

In fact, many successful musicians kept on working at their day jobs, even after “making it big” in the music business. Here are eight musicians who held onto their day jobs while building their music career.

5 Email Mistakes You're Probably Making Right Now

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Crafting the perfect email takes work. It’s not enough to just shoot off a message full of copy-and-paste material and hope it sticks. It requires some time and concentration, and it's easy to slip up and make a mistake without realizing it.

Check out these five no-nos, and be sure your next email to a promoter, venue, writer, or other music impresario doesn't include any of them.

Musician Life

Mar 15, 2017 06:00 AM

Jhoni Jackson

7 Irritating Things Every Musician Deals With

Image via Stocksnap.io.Feeling like an outsider around your non-musician friends? Perpetually working but somehow always-and-forever broke? These are the kind of issues that, as an independent musician, are often universally unavoidable. We deal with them because we love what we do, but that doesn't mean we've got to fully submit to them, either. 

Commiserate by reading our top seven gripes below, and feel free to add your own in the comments.