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The One Thing Most Musicians Do Wrong on YouTube

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The stories of indie artists making it big with a viral video on YouTube entice a lot of musicians to take the leap and set up a YouTube channel themselves. They get all excited, create some cool cover or original music videos and do some promotion, only to get discouraged with the apparent lack of interest from YouTube viewers as their first few covers fall on deaf ears and only get a few hundred views.

It’s frustrating. YouTube is one of the biggest platforms for music and one of the top places people spend their time online, but it’s very difficult to stand out from the crowd. There are a lot of mistakes you can make on YouTube that will negatively affect your exposure, like incorrectly titling or tagging your videos or leaving the default thumbnail, but the number-one problem that holds most musicians back from actually finding success on YouTube is focusing on views instead of subscribers.

3 Things Savvy Musicians Always Add to Their YouTube Videos

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If I've said it once, I've said it a hundred times just on this blog alone: YouTube is so important to you as a musician. You might not like the payout rates or even the website itself, but it doesn’t change the fact that the platform is incredibly popular, and that you’ll be losing out by not investing time and effort into making sure you’re getting as much as possible out of your channel and your videos.

YouTube has an option where you can actually add certain features to your videos, as in right on top of the clip itself! We’ve all seen it, but many people have never really thought about looking into how people do this, or into doing it themselves. If you’re curious, read on. There are a handful of options you might want to start adding to your videos before you post.

YouTube Playlists: How to Automate and Collaborate

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This article originally appeared on The Daily Rind.

 

Playlists are an excellent form of engagement on YouTube. They can be used to provide that laid-back ease of continuous play or cross-promotion of your favorite brands, artists, and shows. Users also curate playlists to create a "visual mixtape" and inject their personality into it. Playlists can be sorted based on themes, genres, fan videos, and more.

What if you could also automate or allow friends to collaborate on this experience? Read on, and find out!

Your YouTube Thumbnails Matter – Here Are 5 Tips to Do Them Right

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As I've said time and time again on this blog, YouTube is probably one of the most important platforms available to you as an artist. You should spend a good chunk of your time thinking about what kinds of videos you want to post, making them all high quality and very watchable, and then also make sure that your descriptions and your bio are up to snuff.

There's one other thing that should be on your mind as you navigate the world of YouTube content as well: your video thumbnails. The thumbnail is that tiny image you see when you're browsing the site, or on the sidebar when you’re watching something. Having one that stands out is one of the best ways for random people to discover you and your work on the site.

Now, this is a minuscule picture we’re talking about, so there is really only so much you can do with it, but there are a few best practices to keep in mind when you’re editing and uploading.

How to Write the Optimal Description for Your YouTube Video

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Of course, the video you post should be the focus of your activity on YouTube, but there's another space that's also extremely important and rather valuable that you should be paying attention to as well: the description. YouTube offers plenty of space for you to write anything your heart desires, but don’t go too crazy. There are a few things you should make sure to include in every YouTube description, though, so think of the following as a checklist to keep in mind every time you upload something!