<iframe src="//www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-TMFBBP" height="0" width="0" style="display:none;visibility:hidden"> Sonicbids Blog - Music Career Advice and Gigs | Jesse Sterling Harrison
Expert Music Career Advice For DIY Musicians
4 Times You Shouldn't Take the Gig
The Number One Mistake Bands Make Right After Booking a Gig
The Ultimate EQ Cheat Sheet for Every Common Instrument
15 Reality Checks Young Artists Need to Hear

The Best Guitar Pedals on the Market for Your Budget

Image via Shutterstock

If you’re a violinist, tone comes from wood and your fingers, and that’s it. If you play electric guitar, there are several more stages in the signal chain that run from your fingers to the listener’s ear. Pedals are so important that many players would rather use a house amp with their own pedals than bring their own amp along and leave the stompboxes at home. But there are so many to choose from, and you can’t buy the whole store. By category, here are some of the best choices in guitar pedals, with a budget option and another choice if cost is no object.

How to Avoid the Most Common Musicians' Injuries

Photo by Cameron Perkins via Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Look up “most dangerous professions.” Music isn’t going to be in the top 10, and that’s a blessing. Those don’t-let-your-guard-down-for-one-second positions generally involve heights, open water, tall trees, and power tools. But music comes with its own hazards, from hecklers armed with glass beer steins to highway mishaps on the way home from a gig.

In warehouses and factories, the first thing new hires generally hear is a safety lecture. For musicians, we take the native hazards for granted all too often. But injuries can stop us from playing, and that’s the headline here. The following is a list of some of the most common ways for musicians to end up on injured reserve and how to avoid them.

The Best Guitar Amps for Every Genre

Image via Wikimedia Commons / CC BY 3.0

For all the talk about how “tone comes from the fingers,” amplifiers are still critical. Just ask any musician who’s been told, “You have to use our backline to cut down on soundchecks. Don’t worry – our gear sounds great!”

Do you really want to play on amps that have been set up according to someone else’s personal style and taste? You may still be finding and refining your guitar sound, but you know what sounds bad, and you want to find that tone that will make your music soar. With that in mind, here are some of the best amps on the market for the styles you play.

Here Are the Dead Simple Ways to Improve Your Sound in the Studio, Instrument by Instrument

Image via Wikimedia Commons / CC BY-SA 2.0

Maybe you’ve spent hundreds of hours in the same room, rehearsing your material. Perhaps you’ve performed dozens of times, on different stages, using the same gear. You’re used to your sound. You like it. But now you’re in the studio and something just doesn’t seem right. What’s the problem?

It’s no surprise when things that were once okay suddenly sound unacceptable in the studio context. For one, you’ve never scrutinized things so closely before. You’re paying attention to every detail, and some things aren’t up to par. Also, you’re hearing things in a different room, possibly though unfamiliar monitor speakers or headphones.

5 Non-Musical Skills You Should Work to Get Better At

Photo by Paparazzo Presents via Wikimedia Commons / CC BY-SA 3.0

In garages and basements all over the world, amazing bands are practicing, writing, and developing their own styles. Some of these could become hitmakers or achieve heavy rotation on your iTunes playlist. But you also might never hear them, because they can’t get out of that garage.

Due to youth, a lack of experience, or a lack of leadership, these bands aren't getting booked consistently and nobody is hearing them. That’s because no one in the band is taking charge of the non-musical things that keep bands playing out.

Are these things the fun parts of being a musician? Probably not. And some of them are pretty hard work, but when these items aren’t handled, bands don’t perform, and they don’t stay together. Here are a few non-musical skills you and your band need to master.