Expert Music Career Advice For DIY Musicians
4 Times You Shouldn't Take the Gig
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15 Reality Checks Young Artists Need to Hear

Why Your Demo Isn't Enough to Make It in the Music Business

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In today’s world, musicians are expected to be a one-stop shop for their own marketing, production, PR, and everything in between. Long gone are the days of A&R managers, discovering your raw talented un-branded and undeveloped. As if it weren't hard enough to complete your demo, you also have to figure out how to promote it and when you should follow up.

Today, there are so many tools that offer ways to automate these added responsibilities, but they don’t handle everything. You still need a strategy and plan to know how you’re going to get your music out into the world.

The 3 Rules You Need to Survive in Nashville

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Nashville can be a strange place. Many people come from all over the world jump in with both feet and think they'll be discovered in six months at the latest. In the meantime, they fail to understand the culture and/or why they aren't welcomed with open arms.

Some of it may have to do with talent, but some of it may have to do with breaking the unspoken rules of Nashville without realizing it. Here are just a few to keep in mind the next time you visit Music City.

3 Surefire Signs You're Overwriting That Song

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You've been hacking away at this song for weeks, and it's still not right. Or maybe it's perfect. It's hard to tell. The point is, you're just too close to it to see the big picture and you'rein danger of overwriting.

If you've been writing for any length of time, you've no doubt encountered this issue. It's something that can really sneak up on even the most seasoned of writers, though – so here are a few tips to help you recognize it.

When Less Is More: 3 Reasons Why Smaller Arrangements Can Make Your Tracks Sound Bigger

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Everyone wants their studio tracks to sound “huge.” In an effort to achieve “hugeness,” many of us follow the obvious path of adding more and more things to our arrangements. If two guitars sound big, then four guitars should sound even bigger, right?

While this makes sense in principle, the results can be paradoxical; often what we achieve by adding more elements to a track isn't a bigger sound but a smaller one.

How does this work? Here are a few examples of some situations when removing elements from your tracks can lead to a fuller sound.

How to Evaluate Song Feedback

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Criticism is vital, especially for a songwriter just starting out. But finding the right criticism – and being able to evaluate what's useful and what's not – is even more key. Since this is a business of opinions, you're going to be getting a lot of feedback. Here are three questions to ask to determine if that feedback is useful.