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4 Targeted Spotify Playlist Ideas Your Fans Will Love

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Getting on spotify playlists is one of the best ways for bands to promote their music. It can also be a bit of an uphill battle to simply get a Spotify curator to add you to a playlist. You need to demonstrate you have a following on Spotify and social media and that there's interest in your music and a general buzz around you to attract these influencers.

Want to Catch the Eye of Spotify Curators? Build Your Own Playlist

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You want to get on a great spotify playlist, right? The only problem is that you only have a couple dozen followers on Spotify, your songs have the infamous “<1000” stream tracker next to them, and you don’t have Spotify-curator contacts who will give you the time of day.

Starting to feel defeated? The good news is that Spotify offers a lot of music promotion options that are all within your grasp to increase your followers and start gaining the attention of Spotify curators.

How to Increase Your Spotify Followers - And Your Listeners

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Spotify is one of the best ways to get your music heard, but first, you need people who will listen. Sure, you can try to get on Spotify playlists and hope the followers will, ahem, follow. But that’s a bit like putting the cart before the horse, especially when you’re talking official Spotify playlists.

One way you can increase your listeners (and maybe earn a coveted playlist spot) is by attracting more Spotify followers. Below are five ways to do just that.

Why You Can't Have It All When It Comes to Music Publicity

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You’re about to hire a music publicist. You have pretty high expectations. You want to see a review in Pitchfork, a premiere on Stereogum, and a session on NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert. You also want to be able to get this at an incredible price because you don’t have a lot of money, so you need to see a really high return on your investment. Oh, and you need him or her to turn it around quickly. In fact, if you don’t see that press within two weeks, you’ll look at the entire effort as an incredible failure.

Here’s the thing: There’s no business that can deliver all that to you without sacrificing something else. When hiring someone, you need to determine what you value most and then look at how both you and the person you’re hiring can meet that. Decide where your most pressing needs lie within the following three areas, and learn how you can get there.

Note that although these three areas may overlap in some cases, it's important to pick one and go with it, especially if you're hiring a publicist for the first time.

Ask a Publicist: What to Do When That Music Journalist Goes AWOL

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One of the biggest frustrations of a publicist is not receiving responses to pitches we send. We sort of anticipate it when the pitch is a cold call or we haven’t yet built a relationship with a writer, but the real head scratchers are when a journalist raises his or her hand high with interest and then seemingly disappears despite repeated follow ups from us.

On a recent Facebook post, a journalist summed this up in one sentence. “If you’re not hearing back from me, it’s because I’m trying to think of a way to tell you 'yes'  and failing."

You may be thinking that if a journalist likes your music, he or she should just write about it. Unfortunately, it’s not that simple. Here are three reasons why an interested journalist may have gone AWOL.