Expert Music Career Advice For DIY Musicians
4 Times You Shouldn't Take the Gig
The Number One Mistake Bands Make Right After Booking a Gig
The Ultimate EQ Cheat Sheet for Every Common Instrument
15 Reality Checks Young Artists Need to Hear

7 Things You Need to Send Along With Your Band's Press Photo

Image via Shutterstock

Everybody knows that having great images in every article about your band is good for your career. Plenty has already been said about what makes for a compelling live shot or a particularly stunning portrait, but not many people talk about the information that people need before they publish a photograph. There’s a lot more than just the artist’s moniker that goes into a caption.

Trust me, as someone who's written about musicians for a while now, it's extremely annoying to be ready to post a story or send off to an editor, only to realize that some detail was left out by a band’s manager or publicist. Please include all of this information along with any photo you and your team send for publications to use, as these details will make everyone's life and job much easier from the start.

5 of the Worst Ways to Get a Music Journalist's Attention

Image via Shutterstock

Getting the attention of music journalists is a struggle for almost everybody in the industry, no matter how popular the artist. There are only so many outlets and so many writers, and there are hundreds of thousands of people trying to get them to listen to their latest creations.

It’s tough, but to those thinking they should do whatever it takes to grab even just a fraction of someone’s attention: think again. There are bad ideas and terrible ways to reach out to writers, and while you may think they’ll give you an advantage, they probably won’t, and they may hurt your chances instead.

Here Are 5 Way More Interesting Things You Can Pitch to Music Blogs

Image via Shutterstock

If you’re disappointed that you aren’t getting a lot of attention from blogs, magazines, and other outlets despite your pitching efforts, think about what you're trying to get. Keep in mind that these places are pitched every day with thousands of people begging for interviews, reviews, and general features.

It’s fine to ask for these, but it’s difficult to stand out. Writers and editors only have so much time, and when everyone is requesting the same things (or worse, nothing in particular, just “coverage”), it all blends together.

Why not try telling these publications that you’re willing to go out of your way to try something totally different? The effort will be appreciated, as will the options you put out there. Here are a few alternative ideas that might make you much more interesting to the outlets you’ve been reaching out to.

How to Get Your Music Featured on Bandcamp

Image via stocksnap.io

Editorial at Bandcamp has been a thing since 2013, but right now the focus on (and following of) their content is sharper than ever. For the unfamiliar, music criticism isn't their bag; the mission instead is to spotlight the best of the hundreds of thousands of bands and artists on the platform.

The qualifying criteria aren't cut and dried, of course. There's no fixed formula for getting your music featured on Bandcamp, and that's actually a good thing.

Bands: You Should Have These 7 Things Ready to Go the Moment a Writer Asks

Image via Shutterstock

Whenever you get the attention of someone in the media, it’s as if lightning has struck. So many writers are flooded with music and are busier than ever, so if you do manage to get someone to listen to your work and they deem it good enough to write about, make sure you're ready for them and for this opportunity.

That means having all your ducks in a row before you even approach anybody. What does “having all your ducks in a row” look like in this situation? In my opinion as a music writer, it means that you've sent me everything I will need in order to post something excellent about you, your band, and the music you’ve just released.