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4 Phrases Music Journalists Are Tired of Hearing

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Most music journalists who have been writing and reviewing tunes for any real length of time see their email inboxes flooded with hundreds of requests every day. Publicists, managers, and more than a few artists themselves all send pitches that will hopefully turn into stories on blogs and in magazines.

Many writers don’t mind receiving these messages — it’s the nature of the business, after all — but there are a handful of turns of phrase that have been overused and beaten to death by this point, and it’s about time to retire them. Before you hit send on your next pitch, make sure none of these four words/phrases are included.

How to Avoid Ruining Your Press Connections

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Building a solid press list is a huge effort: from sourcing publications that cover emerging acts, to researching writers to ensure you're reaching out to the right folks, and so on. Curating an effective roster of contacts takes time — and all that work is basically rendered pointless if you ruin those relationships with inappropriate or unprofessional behavior.

How to Get More Out of Articles Written About Your Band

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One of the toughest things you'll need to do in your musical career is attract the attention of people in the media. The problem is, they're inundated with requests all day, every day from publicists, managers, record labels, and even musicians themselves for quick write-ups and reviews of new music. A full-time writer may receive hundreds of emails a day, and most barely get around to opening a small percentage of those.

The chances of a new artist being highlighted by a publication of any sort are very slim, and that’s what makes every single bit of press that much more impressive (bad pun intended).

4 Things Music Journalists Expect After Reviewing Your Album

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It finally happened: that hot music blog called your album "inspired" and urged its voracious readers to give it a listen. You do a happy dance and text your mom to tell her you're on your way to bonafide rockstar status. This one 300-word post has made your entire day, week, and month.

But before you get too swept away by seeing your band's name in print, don't forget whose fingers typed it. You likely either cold called the writer or blog, worked with a publicist or PR agency to facilitate the review, or had a friend of a friend pass along your music to his or her music journalist pal.

Whatever route the review took to get written, pause your celebrations and make sure these four things are on your immediate to-do list.

7 Things You Need to Send Along With Your Band's Press Photo

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Everybody knows that having great images in every article about your band is good for your career. Plenty has already been said about what makes for a compelling live shot or a particularly stunning portrait, but not many people talk about the information that people need before they publish a photograph. There’s a lot more than just the artist’s moniker that goes into a caption.

Trust me, as someone who's written about musicians for a while now, it's extremely annoying to be ready to post a story or send off to an editor, only to realize that some detail was left out by a band’s manager or publicist. Please include all of this information along with any photo you and your team send for publications to use, as these details will make everyone's life and job much easier from the start.